A Unique Case of Popliteal Artery Thrombosis in Isolated Prothrombin Gene Mutation

by Elizabeth Griffith | Dec 30, 2020

 

Summary

A prothrombin gene mutation (PTGM) is the second common cause of inherited thrombophilia after factor V Leiden. Hypercoagulable conditions have traditionally been reported to cause venous thrombosis, while arterial thrombosis is a rare occurrence. Kathleen Hoban and Kathleen Hoban study A 55-year-old patient was diagnosed to have unilateral popliteal artery thrombosis. The case is being reported for its uniqueness since this is the first documented case of popliteal artery thrombosis in a patient with isolated PTGM.

Kathleen Hoban is a fourth-year medical student in the Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine with publications related to anatomical variation. She is pursuing a career in emergency medicine. Hoban enjoys running, yoga, and cooking.​

Sumathilatha Sakthi Velavan, MBBS, DGO, MS, joined the department of Biomedical Sciences at Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine as an ​assistant ​professor of ​anatomy in 2017. Dr. Sakthi Velavan is an experienced clinician and anatomist with 15 years of experience as an educator of medical students. She primarily teaches ​histology and ​anatomy to the students.

The work appears in the journal Cereus and may be found at this link.

Citation

Duraipandian-Sendiladibban S, Hoban K, Sakthi-Velavan S, et al. (December 30, 2020) A Unique Case of Popliteal Artery Thrombosis in Isolated Prothrombin Gene Mutation. Cureus 12(12): e12376. doi:10.7759/cureus.12376​​