dcsimg David P. Gardner- Ph.D.
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David P. Gardner, Ph.D.

David P. Gardner, Ph.D. is a professor of biochemistry in the Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine. He is a well-known educator in the osteopathic community, with more than 15 years of teaching experience at colleges of osteopathic medicine.

Dr. Gardner earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Eastern Michigan University with a double major in biochemistry and microbiology. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Arizona in Genetics. He then completed a three-year postdoctoral fellowship with the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale Arizona focusing on vertebrate developmental biology. 

Dr. Gardner has been a member of the founding faculty of two new colleges of osteopathic medicine before coming to the Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine. He was a member of the Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine (AZCOM) biochemistry department from 1996 to 2007 specializing in genetics and molecular biology. In 2007, Dr. Gardner joined the founding faculty of the A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (SOMA). During his tenure at SOMA, he taught a wide range of subjects including biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics.

Dr. Gardner is very active with the National Board of Osteopathic Examiners (NBOME) and was recently named a subject matter expert in the field of genetics. He has a particular interest in the understanding of human metabolism by medical students within an integrated curriculum.  He also has a strong interest in the development of critical thinking skills by students during medical school.  His research has most recently focused upon ethanol effects on limb development.

Among his many awards, Dr. Gardner was recognized as professor of the year by the ATSU-SOMA students in 2011 and 2012.

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