dcsimg Kimberly Vogt

Marian Hall 056C
kvogt@marian.edu
(317) 955-6435

Kimberly Vogt, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biology

Education

Ph.D. Ecology and Evolution, Northern Illinois University
B.S. Biology, Northern Illinois University

Professional Affiliations

Sigma Zeta National Honor Society
American Pysiological Society
National Science Teachers Association
Hoosier Association of Science Teachers, Inc.
Celebrate Science Indiana Steering Committee


Every day is a new chance to uncover the mysteries of life.


Fall Courses

  • BIO 204 Cell Biology
  • BIO 205 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis for Biologists
  • BIO 291 Biology Career Seminar
  • BIO 372 Invertebrate Biology (Fall Even)


Spring Courses

  • BIO 204 Cell Biology
  • BIO 205 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis for Biologists
  • BIO 291 Biology Career Seminar
  • BIO 327 Animal Behavior (Spring Even)


Research Interests

Over time, we would expect natural selection to favor those variants that can respond appropriately to a number of environmental conditions such as temperature, water quality, food availability, and, sometimes, even light. For cnidarians, this means changing foraging strategies, reproductive methods, and life histories. Reduced glutathione is the major antioxidant defense in animals cells. The ratio of reduced to oxidized forms of the molecule can serve as an indication of the oxidative state and metabolic activity of the cell. In hydra, reduced glutathione initiates a feeding response despite the absence of food. When well-fed, hydra tend to engage in asexual reproduction by budding. As in colonial cnidarians, hydra shift to sexual reproduction under environmental stress. Thus, glutathione may serve an important role in adjusting life history strategies in response to metabolic signals. The focus of my current research is to determine the connections between indicators of food availability and activation of pathways leading to budding in an evolutionary and ecological context.

Publications

  • Cherry Vogt, K.S., K.L. Harmata, H.L. Coulombe, L. S. Bross, and N.W. Blackstone. 2011. Causes and consequences of stolon regression in a colonial hydroid. The Journal of Experimental Biology 214: 3197-3205.
  • Cherry Vogt, K.S., and N.W. Blackstone. 2009. Redox signaling in the growth and development of colonial cnidarians. In Dipak Kumar Das (Ed.) Methods in Redox Signaling (140-148). New Rochelle, New York:  Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  • Cherry Vogt, K.S., and N.W. Blackstone. 2008. Stolon regression: A mechanism of environmental regulation of colony form in cnidarians. Communicative & Integrative Biology 1(1): 32-33.
  • Cherry Vogt, K.S., G.C. Geddes, L.S. Bross, and N.W. Blackstone. 2008. Physiological characterization of stolon regression in a colonial hydroid. The Journal of Experimental Biology 211: 731-740.
  • Blackstone, N.W., M.J. Bivins, K.S. Cherry, R.E. Fletcher, and G.C. Geddes. 2005. Redox signaling in colonial hydroids: many pathways for peroxide. The Journal of Experimental Biology 208: 383-390.
  • Blackstone, N.W., K.S. Cherry, and D.H. Van Winkle. 2004. The role of polyp-stolon junctions in the redox signaling of colonial hydroids. Hydrobiologia 530/531: 291-298.
  • Blackstone, N.W., K.S. Cherry, and S.L. Glockling. 2004. Structure and signaling in polyps of a colonial hydroid. Invertebrate Biology 123(1): 42-52.
   
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