Cassie Freestone '11

Bachelor of Science Degree, Major in Biology,
Minor in Chemistry
School of Mathematics and Sciences

"I was originally attracted to Marian University because I knew that I wanted to find a school where I would leave as a well-rounded person. Coming here gave me the ability to play sports, receive a great education, and participate in activities that would broaden my horizons."

As an undergraduate, Freestone worked on numerous research projects, including a study of turtles in the Nina Mason Pulliam EcoLab on the campus of Marian University. The scope of her research incorporates scientific topics ranging from parasitology, to ecology, to endocrinology. Freestone completed four poster publications and had a paper published in her name, a feat that many undergraduate science students cannot claim and which made her very marketable for internships and field experiences.

At Marian University, students are encouraged to take charge of their own coursework and shape their own scientific discovery. Freestone says, “The unique research opportunities I had through the School of Mathematics and Sciences helped me learn in a way classroom lectures couldn’t, and helped me understand science beyond the experience of most undergraduate students. I learned how to take charge of my own scientific discovery and develop my identity as a scientist and a student.

In August 2011, she travelled to the coast of Mossel Bay, South Africa, to study shark populations as part of a marine biology international. From there, she completed an internship conserving sea turtle nests in an effort to raise population survival during the summer of 2012 at the Clearwater Marine Aquarium in Clearwater, Florida. Freestone continues to share her experiences as a favorite guest speaker in biology classes at Marian University.

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