High School Seniors - you must apply and be admitted by October 15 for full scholarship consideration. Submit your free application today!

Thad Wilson, Ph.D.

Professor of Physiology
twilson@marian.edu

Biography

Thad WilsonDr. Thad Wilson is a Professor of Physiology and the Physiology Lead for Biomedical Sciences division of the College of Osteopathic Medicine. His research interests are in thermal physiology, eccrine sweat glands, and the interaction between the environment and health / disease. His teaching interests are focused around helping medical students help themselves learn physiology by means of context and clinical application. One of his teaching passions is incorporating innovative teaching methods, such as flipped classrooms, problem-based learning, and team-based learning.

Thad obtained his B.S. and M.S. at the University of Wyoming and Ph.D. at the University of Utah. He completed his post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas and Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas. He also has been fortunate to learn additional scientific techniques at: 1) General Clinical Research Center at Penn State College of Medicine, 2) Righospitalet (National Hospital of Denmark) at the University of Copenhagen, 3) Department of Neurology at Beth Israel Deaconess
Medical Center, and 4) Hillcrest Medical Center at the University of California – San Diego School of Medicine.

Thad has co-authored over 75 peer-reviewed articles primarily in environmental physiology, as well as a physiology textbook (Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews: Physiology). LIR Physiology represents a concise medical-oriented text with clinical applications, visual representations of high-impact physiological processes, and board-style review questions. 

Thad sits on the editorial boards of the Journal of Thermal Biology and the Journal of Applied Physiology and is an Associate Editor for the Environmental Physiology and Occupational Physiology sections for Medicine & Science in Sport & Exercise, has served on a number of governmental and association grant review panels. He is a member of the American Physiological Society and participates in both state and international physiology conferences and organizations.

Clinical/Research Interests:

Interactions of the Thermal Environment on Medical Conditions and Worker Health/Safety

Eccrine Sweat Gland Disorders

Representative Publications:

Crandall, C. G. & Wilson, T. E.   Human cardiovascular responses to passive heat stress.  Comprehensive Physiology, 5: 17-43, 2015.

Wilson, T. E., Klabunde, R. E. & Monahan, K. D.  Using thermal stress to model aspects of disease states. Journal of Thermal Biology, 43: 24-32, 2014.

Recent Publications:

Metzler-Wilson, K. & Wilson, T. E.  Calcium regulation's impact on eccrine sweating and sweating disorders: the view from cells to glands to intact human skin. Experimental Physiology, 101: 345–346, 2016.

Schlader, Z. J., Wilson, T. E., Crandall, C. G.  Mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance during heat stress.  Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical, 196:37-46, 2016.

Metzler-Wilson, K., Toma, K., Sammons, D.L., Mann, S., Jurovcik, A. J., Demidova, O., & Wilson, T. E.  Augmented supraorbital skin sympathetic nerve activity responses to symptom trigger events in rosacea patients.  Journal of Nuerophysiology, 114: 1530-1537, 2015.

Gray, B. D., Metzler-Wilson, K., Dawes, K. W., & Wilson, T. E.  A neural link to understanding rosacea: Focusing on flushing triggers.  Journal of the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology, 33: 11-16, 2015.

Wilson, T. E. & Metzler-Wilson, K.  Sweating chloride bullets: Understanding the role of calcium in eccrine sweat glands and  possible implications for hyperhidrosis.  Experimental Dermatology, 24: 177-178, 2015.

WHAT ARE YOU MADE OF?

Get info Apply now

© 2017 Marian University
Notice of Nondiscrimination
Marian University does not discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity, color, sex, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, creed, national origin, age or disabilities in the selection of administrative personnel, faculty and staff, and students.
*Placement rates are gathered from data collected from graduates within six months of graduation.