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David Gardner, Ph.D.

Professor of Genetics
dpgardner@marian.edu

Biography

Dr. David GardnerDavid P. Gardner, Ph.D. is a professor of genetics in the Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine. He is a well-known educator in the osteopathic community, with almost 20 years of teaching experience at colleges of osteopathic medicine.

Dr. Gardner earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Eastern Michigan University with a double major in biochemistry and microbiology. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Arizona in Genetics. He then completed a three-year postdoctoral fellowship with the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale Arizona focusing on vertebrate developmental biology. 

Dr. Gardner has been a member of the founding faculty of two new colleges of osteopathic medicine before coming to the Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine. He was a member of the Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine (AZCOM) biochemistry department from 1996 to 2007 specializing in genetics and molecular biology. In 2007, Dr. Gardner joined the founding faculty of the A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (SOMA). During his tenure at SOMA, he taught a wide range of subjects including biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics.

Dr. Gardner has been very active with the National Board of Osteopathic Examiners (NBOME) and was the NBOME National Faculty Division Chair of Genetics from 2012-2015. He has a particular interest in the understanding of human metabolism by medical students within an integrated curriculum. He also has a strong interest in the development of critical thinking skills by students during medical school. Current research involves the integration of biomedical science material into the 3rd and 4th years of medical school. His previous research interests focused upon ethanol effects on limb development.

Dr. Gardner was recognized as professor of the year by the ATSU-SOMA students class of 2014 and 2015. Dr. Gardner has been recognized as most outstanding biomedical science faculty member by the class of 2017, 2018 and 2019.

Clinical/Research Interests

  • EGF Receptor Signaling in Squamous Cell Carcinoma.
  • Function of Homeobox gene Hoxc-8 during vertebrate development.
  • Effects of ethanol on limb development in a mouse model of fetal alcohol syndrome.
  • Integration of biomedical science topics into 3rd and 4th year medical school curriculum: The Totally Basic Science Podcast
  • Development of critical thinking skills during medical school.  

Highlighted Publications

Chrisman K, Kenney R, Comin J, Thal T, Suchocki L, Yueh YG, Gardner DP. Gestational ethanol exposure disrupts the expression of FGF8 and Sonic hedgehog during limb patterning. Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2004 Apr;70(4):163-71.

Yueh YG, Gardner DP, Kappen C. Evidence for regulation of cartilage differentiation by the homeobox gene Hoxc-8. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1998 Aug 18;95(17):9956-61.

Gardner DP, Byrne GW, Ruddle FH, Kappen C. Spatial and temporal regulation of a lacZ reporter transgene in a binary transgenic mouse system. Transgenic Res. 1996 Jan;5(1):37-48.

Rundle CH, Macias MP, Yueh YG, Gardner DP, Kappen C. Transactivation of Hox gene expression in a VP16-dependent binary transgenic mouse system. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1998 Jun 16;1398(2):164-78.

Gardner DP, Shimizu N. Loss of cytotoxic effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on EGF receptor overexpressing cells is associated with attenuation of EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity. J Cell Physiol. 1994 Feb;158(2):245-55.


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