dcsimg Marian University To Host Program On Myth And Value Of Bats

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Marian University to Sponsor a Workplace Bullying Prevention and Awareness Seminar

Chris Lytle

Marian’s Adult Programs (MAP) at Marian University recently announced a workplace bullying seminar to be held at the Marian University Theatre on August 12, 2015. This is a free event and open to the public. The topic—workplace bullying and prevention—is applicable to employees at any level including managers, supervisors, human resources personnel, and business owners. It is scheduled for 6-8 p.m., with registration beginning at 5:30 p.m.

This “Work Shouldn’t Hurt” seminar is the result of a collaborative effort between The Chris Lytle Foundation and the students and faculty of MAP’s current Meeting and Event Planning concentration. Classes within this concentration, as well as 31 other courses in MAP, are partnered with local businesses or non-profits to provide creative solutions for actual business challenges. MAP students have worked with organizations like Indy Parks, St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, Indy Eleven, and Broad Ripple Village Association...read more

Pilgrims - Susan Jennifer Ellen

Five days into our time in Assisi, the pilgrims from Marian University have all experienced in new ways what our Franciscan sponsorship values mean—for us as individuals and for the Marian community.

Prayer has been a constant for us. Daily Eucharist—whether in small chapels, large basilicas or our hotel--has become the centering experience of our journey. More than half of us are not Catholic, but this most significant of all Catholic rituals has embraced all and engaged us in the formation of a community of individuals renewed in our commitment to the mission of Marian University—to be a great Catholic university dedicated to excellent teaching and learning in the Franciscan and liberal arts tradition.

Marian University To Host Program On Myth And Value Of Bats

by John Armitage | Nov 27, 2012
The Nina Mason Pulliam EcoLab on the campus of Marian University is educating the public about the presence of bats in the environment. The EcoLab’s ecologists hope continued education and outreach will quell myths about the mammals. The presence of bats
What: A free information program to explain the functions, values, and clarify myths about bats. When: Saturday, April 7, 2012, from 1-3 p.m. Where: Nina Mason Pulliam Nature Center; 3200 Cold Spring Road; Indianapolis, Indiana 46222 Who To Contact: Jody Nicholson, Outreach Ecologist, at 317.946.1433 orjnicholson@marian.edu The Nina Mason Pulliam EcoLab on the campus of Marian University is educating the public about the presence of bats in the environment. The EcoLab’s ecologists hope continued education and outreach will quell myths about the mammals. The presence of bats does not pose a public health concern. The chances of getting bit by a bat are very slim. Less than 5 percent of all bats have rabies.        “The incident with the Indiana University student was very unfortunate because the student didn't have any real chance to prevent the encounter. The problem with rabid bats is that they can start acting outside of their normal ecological routine and unintentionally present themselves to humans either during the day or in a building,” said Jody Nicholson, EcoLab outreach ecologist. Although it's not uncommon for healthy bats to roost in buildings, the Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus) very commonly roosts in buildings or old barns throughout the summer. They are looking for a suitable roost that provides shelter, meets their temperature preference, and provides protection from predators. The Big Brown Bat is one of the heartier bats in the region and because of that, they can have a diverse choice of roosts, which might include a home or attic. Open windows aren't necessarily a preferred entrance to a roosting site. Bats commonly seek entrance to buildings via attic vents or cracks/seams in the exterior. If you see a bat in the house or even active during the day outside on the ground or in the garage, do not touch it or get near it. Do not attempt to contain the animal yourself. Call pest control. The EcoLab’s new bat program helps describe functions, values, and clarify myths about bats. OnSaturday, April 7 from 1-3 p.m., the public is invited to a free program at the Nina Mason Pulliam Nature Center, located in the lower level of Allison Mansion on the campus of Marian University. Enter through the doors on the north end of the mansion that overlook the EcoLab. About the Nina Mason Pulliam EcoLab The Nina Mason Pulliam EcoLab is committed to education about the environment through interaction with the environment. The EcoLab is a 55-acre natural area on the campus of Marian University where environmental restoration began 100 years ago with esteemed landscape architect, Jens Jensen, and continues today with Marian University students, K-12 school groups, and the general public.
© 2012 Marian University
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